Grants for Autism Spectrum Disorders

This list is only a resource to assist you in finding possible grants from charitable organizations. All questions regarding grants should be directed to the organization listed, via their website or phone number.The Kaufman Children’s Center has made every effort to provide high-quality and helpful grant information listed below, but they cannot be held liable for errors or the quality of the grant sources. Information should be independently verified and confirmed.

Posted by Emily K. Hulse

www.aacfinc.org Aid for Autistic Children Foundation, Inc.™ mission: Reduce the financial burden on poverty stricken and disenfranchised families and caretakers coping with autism, through debt forgiveness, so attention and resources can be focused on creating a proper living and learning environment for their autistic loved one.


www.aboutprojectIam.com
is strictly a fundraising foundation whose main function is to distribute money to families in the Toledo area so they can have their children diagnosed, treated, and moving forward while living with Autism.


www.act-today.org
fund effective treatments, assessments and needed life supports with grants from $100-$5,000. Applications with multiple children with ASD and households with income below $100,000 are reviewed first.


www.acttodayformilitaryfamilies.org
real help for military families dealing with autism.


www.angelautismnetwork.org
A.N.G.E.L. Inc offers assistance and support for children with autism living in Wisconsin.


www.autismcares.org
This collaborative agency offers funding to families across the US who are living with autism and also are coping with a major crisis such as flood or fire. AutismCares assists families who meet the eligibility criteria to cover costs associated with housing, automobile repair, insurance premiums, medical care, prescriptions, daycare, funeral expenses, and other items on a case-by-case basis. Income cap of $40,000.


www.autismescapes.org
primary purpose is to arrange air travel on private jets for families in need of medical care for their children.


www.bloomingwithautism.org
$80,000 annual income cap and grants for $2,000 for therapies.


www.friendsofjacob.org
Provide financial assistance for medical bills, therapy, equipment, therapeutic horseback riding and respite care for Michigan residents.


www.generationrescue.org
Many individuals with autism suffer from treatable conditions like gut issues, sleep disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction which directly impact speech development, behavior and focus. Our grant program provides the opportunity to pursue treating these underlying symptoms of autism


www.gohfoundation.org
Spectrum of Hope Foundation provides advocacy grants to families in California.


www.theisaacfoundation.org
The ISAAC Foundation provides financial grants for therapy to families in Spokane, Stevens, Lincoln, Whitman and Kootenai Counties in Washington state.


www.itaalk.org
provides interactive technology to children (0-22) with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, and educational training on interactive technology to families, educators, and service providers of children with special needs.


www.jacksplaceforautism.com
Jack’s Place for Autism Foundation has created “Jack’s Dollars”, a Scholarship Program to help families in Michigan afford the support they need for a variety of programs


www.lend4health.blogspot.com
/ a unique program that provides interest free microloans (in the amount of a few hundred dollars) to families from other families. Families interested in receiving a loan post on the blog, and may receive contributions that must be paid back over time.


www.lilmackids.org
The Lil MAC Kids Foundation was formed to assist needy families in Ohio and Minnesota bridge the gap for therapies for ASD. Applications are accepted October-November and awarded by December 15th.


www.maggieshope.org
always looking for ways to directly help families in need that are affected by autism


www.mygoalautism.org
The purpose of MyGOAL Family Grant is to enrich the body, mind, and spirit of individual(s) with Autism Spectrum Disorders, resulting in a higher quality of life. New Jersey residents only.


www.nationalautismassociation.org
NAA’s Helping Hand Program was developed as a financial aid tool for families most in need. Do not apply if annual net income exceeds $50,000.


www.pjjraf.org
Pervis Jackson Jr Autism Foundation has start a fund to help needy parents of children with disabilities to get respite or other support services


www.tacanow.org/about-taca/family-scholarship-program/
assistance with diagnosis, DAN! Conference, DAN! Appointments, follow up and lab work.


www.thecolorofautism.org
organization committed to educating and assisting African American families with Autistic children. The Back to School iPad Program opens several times through out the year.

If you have any questions or concerns, contact Speech-Language Pathologist Christine Wilson!

I get asked all the time to share early indicators of Autism. Here are a few:

Signs and symptoms of autism in babies and toddlers

If autism is caught in infancy, treatment can take full advantage of the young brain’s remarkable plasticity. Although autism is hard to diagnose before 24 months, symptoms often surface between 12 and 18 months.  If signs are detected by 18 months of age, intensive treatment may help to rewire the brain and reverse the symptoms.

The earliest signs of autism involve the absence of normal behaviors—not the presence of abnormal ones—so they can be tough to spot. In some cases, the earliest symptoms of autism are even misinterpreted as signs of a “good baby,” since the infant may seem quiet, independent, and undemanding. However, you can catch warning signs early if you know what to look for.

Some autistic infants don’t respond to cuddling, reach out to be picked up, or look at their mothers when being fed.

Early signs of autism in babies and toddlers

  • Doesn’t make eye contact (e.g. look at you when being fed).
  • Doesn’t smile when smiled at.
  • Doesn’t respond to his or her name or to the sound of a familiar voice.
  • Doesn’t follow objects visually.
  • Doesn’t point or wave goodbye or use other gestures to communicate.
  • Doesn’t follow the gesture when you point things out.
  • Doesn’t make noises to get your attention.
  • Doesn’t initiate or respond to cuddling.
  • Doesn’t imitate your movements and facial expressions.
  • Doesn’t reach out to be picked up.
  • Doesn’t play with other people or share interest and enjoyment.
  • Doesn’t ask for help or make other basic requests.

The following delays warrant an immediate evaluation by your child’s pediatrician

  • By 6 months: No big smiles or other warm, joyful expressions.
  • By 9 months: No back-and-forth sharing of sounds, smiles, or other facial expressions.
  • By 12 months: Lack of response to name.
  • By 12 months: No babbling or “baby talk.”
  • By 12 months: No back-and-forth gestures, such as pointing, showing, reaching, or waving.
  • By 16 months: No spoken words.
  • By 24 months: No meaningful two-word phrases that don’t involve imitating or repeating.